Dear Dairy: Counting the True Cost of Milk

Really looking forward to heading to NZ in July to speak about the impact of the lives and deaths of dairy cattle on my art practice.

Dear Dairy is a one day symposium hosted by the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies (NZCHAS), University of Canterbury, Ōtautahi/ Christchurch on Friday 21 July

Keynote speakers:
Dr Lynn Mowson, Human-Rights and Animal Ethics Research Network [HRAE], University of Melbourne, Vice-Chair of the Australasian Animal Studies Association:  ‘beautiful little dead things and udder-matters’
Dr Tobias Linné, Director of the Lund University Critical Animal Studies Network, Sweden, and Professor Iselin Gambert, Associate Director, Legal Research & Writing Program, The George Washington University Law School, USA: ‘Got Mylk? Uncoupling the Exploitation of Milk’
Invited Plenaries:
Associate Professor Philip Armstrong, New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies, University of Canterbury:  ‘Welcome to the Milk Machine: The History of Pastoral Industrialization in Aotearoa New Zealand’
Dr Melissa Boyde, Senior Research Fellow, School of Arts, English and Media, Wollongong University, Australia: ‘Condensed Lives: Hope in Australia’s Dairy Industry’
Jasmijn DeBoo, CEO of Save Animals from Exploitation, New Zealand:‘The Green Protein Revolution – Policy Solutions to Move Away from Dairy Farming’
Professor Andrew Knight, Director of the Centre for Animal Welfare, University of Winchester, and Director of Research and Education with SAFE: ‘Welfare Problems Experienced by Dairy Cows’
Dr Alison Loveridge, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Canterbury: ‘The Last Frontier: High Country Dairying and the Complexity of Welfare’
Rowan Taylor, Senior Policy Analyst at Ministry for the Environment, Canterbury & West Coast, New Zealand: ‘Dire Dairy and the State of the Environment’
Dr Lynley Tulloch PhD Geography, founder of Starfish Bobby Calf Project:
‘The Story of Starfish Bobby Calf Project: Activist Ethnography in the New Zealand Dairy Industry’

back in the studio

Selvedge at Space@Collins has finished and it’s great to now have time to get back into the studio and make some new work – lots of ideas!

SPOM – Sexual Politics of Meat Exhibition

spom

The Sexual Politics of Meat Exhibition is coming up soon at The Animal Museum.  The exhibition itself will run from 26 February till 30 April 2017.  I’ll be there for the install and opening weekend – and I’m thrilled at the line up of events – http://theanimalmuseum.com/events/spom-opening-weekend/

The Sexual Politics of Meat Exhibition: Opening Weekend Festivities

“How does someone become something?” – Fourteen contemporary women artists ask and explore this very question through a variety of media in The Sexual Politics of Meat, a landmark and thought-provoking exhibition presented by The Animal Museum and curated by Kathryn Eddy, Janell O’Rourke, and L.A. Watson.

EXHIBITION PROGRAMMING
Join us for an insightful weekend with the legendary Carol J. Adams, author of The Sexual Politics of Meat, Dr. Stephen F. Eisenman, and the exhibition curators and artists.

OPENING RECEPTION
With special guests: SPOM author Carol J. Adams, Dr. Stephen F. Eisenman (author, The Cry of Nature: Art and the Making of Animal Rights), Martin Rowe (Lantern Books), and the exhibition curators and artists. PLUS live jazz music from Stray Dog Song, wine, beer and vegan bites.

SUNDAY COLLOQUIUM:
2 to 3:30 PM
“The history of the sexual politics of meat slide show: working with ARTISTS, liberating ideas and oppressive images” presented by Carol J. Adams, followed by a Q&A

The Slide Show provides an ecofeminist analysis of the interconnected oppressions of sexism, racism, and speciesism by exploring the way popular culture draws on dominant Western philosophical viewpoints regarding race, gender, and species. It identifies how meat has been a valued masculine-identified protein source and the ways that assumptions about meat eating reinforce a gender binary. It proposes that many meat advertisements are conduits for hate-speech against women and also that they offer ways to encode “whiteness” without being explicit.

4 to 5:00 PM
“Women, Animals, and Art” Panel Discussion
A rousing discussion with Carol J. Adams, the curators, and artists that address the theories found within the book. Panel moderator: Dr. Stephen Eisenman, author of The Cry of Nature: Art and the Making of Animal Rights

Foray into fashion

And so off we went to the #VAMFF [Melbourne Fashion Festival] VIP preview … I made a small wearable sculptural object – a fleshlump necklace.  Continuing my practice of re-purposing my sculptures, each time layering the subject of one onto the next – these lumps were made from off cuts from the Why Listen to Animals? speaking fleshlumps, which were in turn made from the full human-animal figure from beautiful little dead things.  They were strung on a latex ‘milk’ string from boobscape (udder matters).

Review – The Art of the Animal

A/Professor Annie Potts has just reviewed The Art of the Animal for Antennae: Journal of Nature in Visual Culture.  Of my work she says –  “The eeriest and and arguably most provocative artworks in this book appear in Melbourne-based Lynn Mowson’s essay “Beautiful Little Dead Things.”” [sic]  and “Slink resembles human-animal hybrid carcasses, drained of blood to a shade of yellow decay: strung up, the sculptures look like the grotesque bodies found hanging in slaughterhouses or meat lockers.  Through these stunning works Mowson succeeds in highlighting the tension between presence and absence, human and animal, reality and fiction”.

The review can be read online here.

Making flesh lumps speak

‘Butchering’ an old work from beautiful little dead things to make some new [hopefully speaking] fleshlumps for ‘Why Listen to Animals’ Liquid Architecture/Westspace, 20 October 2016.

A little bit of strategic anthropomorphism at play here – channeling diary cows …